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first_imgA new species of short-tailed whip scorpion has been discovered by two arachnologists, Gustavo Ruiz and Roberta Valente of the Universidade Federal do Pará in Brazil, who described the new species in an article published in the journal PLOS ONE last month.The new species belongs to the genus Surazomus in the Hubbardiidae family of the order Schizomida. Schizomids are small arachnids who can typically be found in leaf litter and caves or in the cavities beneath tree bark, logs, and stones in humid tropical and sub-tropical forests; they are commonly known as short-tailed whip scorpions because of the short flagella possessed by both males and females.More than 200 Schizomids have been discovered around the world, but the order has not yet been widely studied. A new species of short-tailed whip scorpion has been discovered in the eastern Amazon.The discovery was made by two arachnologists, Gustavo Ruiz and Roberta Valente of the Universidade Federal do Pará in Brazil, who described the new species in an article published in the journal PLOS ONE last month.The new species belongs to the genus Surazomus in the Hubbardiidae family of the order Schizomida. Schizomids are small arachnids who can typically be found in leaf litter and caves or in the cavities beneath tree bark, logs, and stones in humid tropical and sub-tropical forests; they are commonly known as short-tailed whip scorpions because of the short flagella possessed by both males and females.Ruiz and Valente described the new short-tailed whip scorpion based on a single specimen less than 5 millimeters long collected by arachnologist Regiane Saturnino, in whose honor the species was named Surazomus saturninoae. The specimen was collected with a pitfall trap in primary upland Amazonian rainforest in the Brazilian state of Pará.According to Ruiz and Valente, the male specimen has a distinctive pentagon-shaped flagellum, similar to three other known Surazomus species. The authors refer to all four species as “the arboreus-group of Surazomus” after the first of the species to be discovered, Surazomus arboreus, which was described to science in 2000.Mating march in Surazomus. Male dragging locked female by the flagellum (note female chelicerae in vertical position). Credit: Ruiz et al, 2019 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213268The flagellum of the Surazomus saturninoae male exhibits “unusual morphology,” the authors write in the paper, affording new insights into the mating habits of all four of the arboreus-group of Surazomus species. The evolutionary drivers behind the different shapes of Surazomus male flagella are still a mystery, as are the mechanisms by which females anchor while mating onto males’ flagella with appendages in front of their mouths called chelicerae, the researchers say.Two “coupling pockets” discovered to be present on S. saturninoae male flagella might help us better understand the position that the arachnids assume while coupling, a process known as “the mating march.”“The flagellum of the male is highly modified and held by the chelicerae of the female during copulation, in a phase called as Paarungsmarsch (= mating march), when she is dragged forward onto the spermatophore,” Ruiz and Valente write. “The anchoring mechanism is still poorly understood, but the male flagellum is certainly sexually selected, as it has diverse forms throughout the order in the mating march, in particular, how the female chelicerae anchor onto the male flagellum.”More than 200 Schizomids have been discovered around the world, but the order has not yet been widely studied.CITATION• Ruiz, G. R., & Valente, R. M. (2019). Description of a new species of Surazomus (Arachnida: Schizomida), with comments on homology of male flagellum and mating march anchorage in the genus. PloS one, 14(3), e0213268. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213268FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Arachnids, Environment, New Species, Research, Species Discovery center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

first_imgThe thrust of this fifth article of the series centered on how to improve self and help others do the same, is on how to convert obstacles to assets. All human beings do face serious disasters, challenges, problems, and stumbling blocks from time to time in life. How does one handle them? How one deals with such problems determines in large measure one’s character and even final destiny. In this article we shall be sharing some ways we all can transform our problems and difficulties into opportunities. How? We shall be finding out below. The fourth article on making the most of available opportunities highlighted the following points:An opportunity is by definition a chance or favorable circumstance or condition to do something or make some progress or profit. An opportunity can take the form of time, resource or a favorable situation to improve.Like a gift or talent God has endowed all persons with some opportunity of some kind. There is hardly anyone who has no opportunities of any kind at all. Some people have more than others but I do not know anyone who has no opportunity to make something of himself/herself. The availability of time, favorable age, raw materials, a natural talent, learning institutions, self-employment chances, employment facilities, industrial and entrepreneurial possibilities constitute vast opportunities to make good use of to better self and others.What is often overlooked in seeking opportunities is recognizing problems, challenges, crises and even denials of rights as hidden sources of opportunity. Recognizing therefore opportunities in myriad forms around and in each one of us is the real challenge. We all need plenty of wisdom made of common sense to see great potentials in ourselves and the people and things and circumstances around us. Liberia is a classic case. There are just so much natural resources lying around: a fertile soil latent with agricultural economic value, plenty of rain and sunshine, enough warmth and cold, diamonds, gold, iron ore, signs of commercial quantity of oil, fish, animal and bird of all types and kinds in a nation with a small population (three point five or four million people).Of course there is one thing to perceive potentials and opportunities in self, environment, circumstance and persons around and quite another to take advantage of them and turn them into tangible assets that can be used to improve the quality of life for self and others. This requires a lot of perceptiveness, determination and the courage to act on what one envisions and dreams about. This is where this article comes in, to suggest ways to convert problems into opportunities. Joshua David Stone and Gloria Excelsias assert that every crisis is an opportunity: “Any crisis is an opportunity to change direction in your life”. They reveal that the word crisis is of Greek origin and it means “a turning point in a disease.” Their conclusion is: “So a crisis is truly an opportunity for a turning point in our lives”. No bitter experience, or problem, or difficulty or obstacle needs to be the end of our dreams. In fact, most of our so-called liabilities can and must be turned into opportunities. The question is how?We need to learn to see great potentials in our problems and challenges in life. There is a need to look beyond the difficulties and find in them the opportunities to make ourselves and others better. We can do this by not letting the problems kill our passion or determination to overcome and be winners. There are often valuable lessons in meeting and overcoming problems in life. Problems test our resolve and patience and overcoming them somehow increases, refines inner and often hidden abilities that we thought we did not have.Sometime we learn more from failure than success. Failure tries our pride and humbles us if we overcome it and forge ahead. I recall my experience of failure when a colleague from another African country and I did our MA thesis in one month, working often ten hours a day apart from Sundays. After three weeks of hard work he and I submitted the first drafts of all three chapters and unfortunately for me, two of mine were rejected and had to be re-done but all of his were accepted and he just had to make modest modifications. I was devastated and lost hours of sleep. Before then I had always come first in any class I had taken. But after the initial frustration I regained my passion and worked harder than ever before and at the end of the day got an “A” while he got only a regular “B”. So failure produced in me hidden creativity that was released as a result of a temporary crisis! I learnt more from the challenge than if I had succeeded at the first try.Some experts on how to turn problems into opportunities speak about “turning stumbling blocks into stepping stones”, “misfortunes into fortunes”, “from grass to grace”, “from reliability to asset”, and “from dishonor to glory”. All this is possible only if we try harder and see our problems as opportunities.overcome and be winners. There are often valuable lessons in meeting and overcoming problems in life. Problems test our resolve and patience and overcoming them somehow increases, refines inner and often hidden abilities that we thought we did not have.Sometime we learn more from failure than success. Failure tries our pride and humbles us if we overcome it and forge ahead. I recall my experience of failure when a colleague from another African country and I did our MA thesis in one month, working often ten hours a day apart from Sundays. After three weeks of hard work he and I submitted the first drafts of all three chapters and unfortunately for me, two of mine were rejected and had to be re-done but all of his were accepted and he just had to make modest modifications. I was devastated and lost hours of sleep. Before then I had always come first in any class I had taken. But after the initial frustration I regained my passion and worked harder than ever before and at the end of the day got an “A” while he got only a regular “B”. So failure produced in me hidden creativity that was released as a result of a temporary crisis! I learnt more from the challenge than if I had succeeded at the first try.Some experts on how to turn problems into opportunities speak about “turning stumbling blocks into stepping stones”, “misfortunes into fortunes”, “from grass to grace”, “from reliability to asset”, and “from dishonor to glory”. All this is possible only if we try harder and see our problems as opportunities.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgThe funeral has taken place in New Castle, Delaware, United States of America, of Dr. Flomo Y. Stevens, a 1963 graduate of Cuttington College and Divinity School (now Cuttington University). Dr. Stevens died on November 15, 2015 in the State of Delaware. He was 76.Dr. Stevens was a former Dean and Professor, University of Liberia College of Business. He also served as Professor at several American universities, including Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, University of Michigan, and St. Lawrence Technical University, Southfield, MI.In his funeral sermon at Hope Lutheran Church in New Castle, DE last Saturday, Dr. Steven’s nephew, the Rev. Isaac Stevens, former Vice Principal for Administration at the Booker Washington Institute (BWI), said Dr. Stevens left a legacy of honoring and serving God, loving and caring for his immediate and extended family, and teaching and caring for many students in the fields of Accounting, Economics and Econometrics (the mathematics of economics). His is a legacy not of fame or fortune, but of fruitful living, which will be acknowledged in Heaven, Rev. Stevens noted.The preacher urged his listeners to make a difference now, so that they may leave a positive and lasting legacy tomorrow.He told the audience that his uncle Flumo took him (Isaac) from the sixth grade and educated him to the Master’s degree level. Mrs. Olina Bailey, Dr. Steven’s former wife of 28 years, thanked their daughter Wubu and other children, grandchildren and others for bringing their ailing father from Michigan to Delaware and caring for him, and for being at his beside side when he passed. Olina, who was with the children at their father’s bedside when he passed, played a key role in organizing the funeral. Mr. Kenneth Yakpawolo Best, the only Cuttington classmate at the funeral, in a brief tribute, recalled that Dr. Stevens’ classmates remember him for his brilliance in Math, which he willingly shared with many of them.Mr. Best described Flumo as humble, kind and serious-minded, always willing to share. “We remember that all of us from various parts of Liberia, along with him, entered the Cuttington campus in Suacoco, then in the Central Province (now Bong County) in early February 1960 as freshmen. Most of us graduated with him on December 2, 1963.“Watching Flumo on the Cuttington campus,” Mr. Best said, “I always knew that he would go far.” The Cuttington classmates, Mr. Best recalled, included Dr. Walter T. Gwenigale, Wilton Sankawulo, young Bacon and Zizi Harris—all of whom graduated together with Flumo in 1959 from the Lutheran Training Institute (LTI) in Salayea, Lofa County. Flumo’s other Cuttington classmates included Esli Holder, Genevieve Best-Dorbor, George Anderson, Daniel T. Goe, Joseph Brown, John Stewart, Harwene (Peter) Tyee, Robert Ellis, Dr. James T. Tarpeh, Dr. Jerry Sauser, Counselor Z. Maulay B. Reeves and his wife Ruth Lymas Reeves, Rose Mendscole King Sherman, Mrs. Cassell-Reeves, Ruth Doe, Victoria Collins Ireland, Ambassador Thomas Brima, Kenneth Y. Best; and the classmates from Kenya in East Africa–Christopher Onyango, Charles Mbuthia, Phillip Ochieng and Obadiah Ngweri; as well as Bill Madundo of Tanzania. Dr. Flumo Yanquoi Stevens was born in Fisibu, Lofa County on September 23, 1939 unto the union of Gelepa and Lorpu Bonawu. He was later adopted by his uncle, Daniel K. Stevens.Young Flumo was baptized in the Lutheran Church, Lofa County and later became a member of Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Southfield, Michigan.Following Cuttington, Flumo earned the Master’s degree from Syracuse University, New York, and the MA and PhD degrees from the University of Nebraska. After teaching in several US universities, including Wayne State in Detroit, Michigan, University of Michigan and Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, MI, Dr. Stevens returned home in 1977 to become Dean and Professor at the UL Business College. He returned to the USA in 1979 to help care for an ailing child.He has published several articles on monetary policies of Liberia and a Managerial Accounting textbook adaptable to the needs of Liberian entrepreneurs. Dr. Flumo Yanquoi Stevens is survived by four children: Kolu Stevens, Wubu Stevens-Hendricks (LerMande), Bonawu and Mackerson Kowa Stevens (Mackow), four grandchildren: Bonawu Stevens, Jr., Kayla and Jaylee Stevens and Kobe Hendricks; and former wife of 28 years and care giver, Mrs. Olina Bailey. Also left to mourn his loss are three sisters: Yama Garwee, Viola and Nancy Stevens; many nieces, nephews and other family and friends in the USA and Liberia. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgStory Links The University of Toronto Varsity Blues men’s volleyball team is competing at the 39th annual Excalibur Volleyball Classic, January 5-7, at York University The Blues opened the tournament with a narrow 3-2 (29-27, 16-25, 22-25, 25-22, 18-20) loss to the Nipissing Lakers on Friday afternoon. Head coach John Barrett commented that “Martin Kosic had a good match with five blocks, while Zia Karim and Nick Trewern were attached well. Daniel Tudor played well at libero.” The Blues take on the Humber Hawks and St. Jean Sur Richelieu Geants on Saturday at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., respectively.For more information, scores and highlights on your favourite U of T athletes and teams, please visit www.varsityblues.ca. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat and Facebook for the latest and greatest in Varsity Blues intercollegiate athletics. Print Friendly Version Toronto followed that up with a 3-1 (25-21, 12-15, 14-25, 24-26) loss to the Western Mustangs on Friday night. “Tom Meier had four blocks and rookie setter Gavin McCurdy set the whole match. Austin Valjas played well in the middle and Andrew Kos had a good match at libero.”last_img read more

first_imgEducation, consider the most precious gift, is difficult to access in the Amerindian community of Wakapoa, Lower Pomeroon, Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam). This is according to People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP\C) councillor Brian Basil, who during a recent statutory meeting in Region Two, said that secondary school children in the area are left to suffer as many parents cannot afford to send them to school due to the exorbitant fees charged by the captains of the David G boats.Councillor Brain BasilBasil, who is Chairman of the Hinterland Affairs Committee in the Region, said that the Toshao of the community complained to him about the inadequacy of teachers at the school. He said the school’s syllabus is lagging and so are the children in their education.The councillor informed his fellow colleagues that several requests were made to the Department of Education about filling the school vacancies, noting that to date nothing has been done, and often the children are left unattended in their classrooms due to the lack of teachers.In addition, parents were asked to pay $1000 weekly to transport their children to school with the boats which were gifted by President David Granger to the Pomeroon communities.He also informed the council that presently the dormitory at Wakapoa is incomplete due to the faulty works done by the contractor. He argued that children are suffering and something really needs to be done.Government Councillor, Naithram, commenting on the issue said that he recently visited the dormitory at Wakapoa and he was shocked to see the ‘faulty’ works that were done by the contractor.Naithram questioned why children have to suffer due to negligence by an administration. He also informed the council that the contractor was previously blacklisted. He therefore called on REO, Rupert Hopkinson to intervene to resolve the issue of substandard works.last_img read more

first_img1 Jack Butland has injured the same ankle he broke while on international duty in March Stoke and England goalkeeper Jack Butland has revealed he will undergo surgery next week on his injured ankle.Butland is yet to play this season having suffered the problem in training with the Potters last month, to the same ankle he broke while on international duty in March.Reports have suggested he could be facing another two months out of action.Butland wrote on Twitter on Friday: “A little update on the injury! I’ll be having a minor operation on Monday to resolve my current ankle issue!”The 23-year-old added: “Rather than push through and risk damaging further, I’d like to have it sorted for good and be back to the levels I was at last year!“I’m as positive as always and will do everything to be back as soon as possible!“Thank you for all your support!”last_img read more

first_img Jeffrey Schlupp in action for Leicester City 1 Crystal Palace have signed midfielder Jeffrey Schlupp from Leicester on a four-and-a-half year deal.The Ghana midfielder leaves the Premier League champions to join the Eagles’ relegation scrap in a reported £12million transfer and is the first major signing for new Palace manager Sam Allardyce.German-born Schlupp came through the Leicester youth ranks and helped the club secure a shock title success in May 2016, but the 24-year-old winger has seen his chances of regular action with Claudio Ranieri’s side limited this season.A post on the official Crystal Palace Twitter feed read: “#CPFC are delighted to announce the signing of @Jeffrey_Schlupp from @LCFC on a four-and-a-half year deal!last_img read more

first_imgCHATSWORTH – Three boys were struck by a car Monday afternoon while trying to cross a street and at least two of them were in critical condition, authorities said. Two 12-year-olds and a 13-year-old were hit by a car shortly before 5 p.m. in the 21100 block of Parthenia Street, authorities said. All three of the boys were transported to local hospitals. No other information was immediately available. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’Many were treating the gathering as their last, uncertain whether they would be alive or healthy enough to travel to Hawaii for the next big memorial ceremony, the 70th anniversary. “It is because of you and people like you that we have the freedoms we enjoy today,” Capt. Taylor Skardon said after relating each ship’s story at the end of the ceremony. A priest gave a Hawaiian blessing and Marines performed a rifle salute. For many, it could be their last return to the World War II attack site. “Sixty-five years later, there’s not too many of us left,” said Don Stratton, a seaman 1st class who was aboard the USS Arizona on Dec. 7, 1941. “In another five years, I’ll be 89. The good Lord willing, I might be able to make it. If so, I’ll probably be here. I might not even be around. Who knows? Only the good Lord knows.” PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii – One by one, aging survivors from ships sunk 65 years ago Thursday in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor laid wreaths under life preserver rings honoring their ships. Nearly 500 survivors bowed their heads at 7:55 a.m., the minute planes began bombing the harbor in a surprise attack that thrust the United States into World War II. “America in an instant became the land of the indivisible,” said former NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw, the author of “The Greatest Generation,” who spoke at the shoreside ceremonies. “There are so many lessons from that time for our time, none greater than the idea of one nation greater than the sum of its parts.” The veterans, most in Hawaiian aloha shirts, were honored with prolonged applause at the solemn ceremony near where some of the ships remain rusting and moss-covered under the harbor’s waters. Stratton and other survivors were boarding a boat to the white memorial straddling the sunken hull of the USS Arizona, where they later laid wreaths and leis in honor of the dead. “We thank those who lost their lives 65 years ago, and we honor the survivors and their families who are with us here today,” said Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle. The Arizona sank in less than nine minutes after a 1,760-pound armor-piercing bomb struck the battleship’s deck and hit its ammunition magazine, igniting flames that engulfed the ship. More people died on the Arizona than any other ship as 1,177 servicemen, or about 80 percent of its crew, perished. Altogether, the surprise attack killed 2,390 Americans and injured 1,178. Twelve ships sank and nine vessels were heavily damaged. More than 320 U.S. aircraft were destroyed or heavily damaged by the time the invading planes were done sweeping over military bases from Wheeler Field to Kaneohe Naval Air Station. Japanese veterans who participated in the attack as navigators and pilots were also scheduled to pay their respects, offering flowers at the Arizona memorial for the Americans and Japanese who died. Japan lost 185 men, mostly on dive-bombers, fighters and midget submarines.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imgJackson County Jail medical staff members Lea Ann Wheeler, LPN, and Ed Rutan, LPN, along with Jail Commander Charlie Murphy recently received training at the 2017 Indiana Jail Summit held in Bloomington, Indiana.The training was provided by Advanced Correctional Healthcare in cooperation with the Indiana Sheriff’s Association.Training consisted of;Deciphering the Malingering of PsychosisOverdose as a Rising Cause of Death in JailsTreating Mental IllnessIdentifying and Treating Common Infectious DiseasesMerging Healthcare with SecurityProfessional Boundaries in Correctional Medical CareThe Jackson County Sheriff is committed to providing a higher standard of training for our facility. Instructors for the course were;Jessica Young, Esq., CCHP Senior CounselMelissa Caldwell, PhD, CCHP / Director of Mental Health ServicesDeb Ash, RN, MSN, MBA, LNC, CCHP / Vice President of ComplianceDr. Michael Mitcheff, MBA, CCHP / Corporate Medical Directorlast_img read more